1934 Ford 3 Window Coupe; Rebuilt Ford Tough!

1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom front view left image1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom, click to enlarge

Who doesn’t just love a great ‘ Lil deuce coupe’ ! The feature ’34 Ford we see here is one such car you cant help but love. Chopped, channeled, overpowered, everything you could ask for in a car like this and more!

1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom 514 V8 engine image1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom 514 V8 engine, click to enlarge
 
And power is an understatement! A Ford V8 racing engine, 514 cubic inches worth making 500 horsepower and 586 ft-lbs torque! The engine features racing camshaft with roller rockers, MSD ignition and 850 cfm Holley double pumper carb. Stainless steel headers dump into 3 inch exhaust pipes. Chrome abounds everywhere under the hood, intake, valve covers and the distributor. A huge Ford racing air cleaner sits on the carburetor complete with a 3 inch high K and N air filter.

1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom Crager Street Pro wheel image1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom Crager Street Pro wheel, click to enlarge
 
The transmission of choice for this coupe is a Ford C6 automatic. Tweaked out with a shift kit and complete with a 2600 rpm stall torque converter. A narrowed Ford 8.8 inch limited slip differential put the power to the pavement. Of course all this power is pointless if you can’t stop so a front disc, rear drum setup was fitted to help haul this sucker down when needed. All stainless steel brake lines were used. Oh, and we mustn’t forget the line lock installed for those tire warming burnouts. The classic street rod look is capped off using Crager Street Pro wheels with P195/60 tires up front and P225/50 out back.

1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom grille image1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom grille, click to enlarge
 
The body is all steel with new hood and fenders sourced. The car is chopped 3 inches and lowered as well. Mustang II front suspension is fully chromed for those show days. Further features of the body include shaved door and trunk handles, hidden door hinges, power door locks remote controllable, and electric windows. The body work and paint were performed by John Guenther and the clear coat candy apple red paint is flawless. That gorgeous chrome grille you see is actually just the stock grille, but it looks so good I at first thought it was a custom unit. The radiator behind is aluminum, and just in front of the main rad lurks a large transmission fluid cooler.

1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom interior image1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom interior, click to enlarge
 
The fully custom tan interior features front bucket seats out of a wrecked F150 Harley Davidson edition recovered in faultless lamb skin leather. White face gauges in a custom dash pod include tachometer, speedometer, water, oil and voltage gauges. The gauge surround is cherry wood. A custom leather wrapped center console rounds out the interior niceties.

1934 Ford 3 window coupe rear view left image1934 Ford 3 window coupe custom rear view left, click to enlarge
 
This Ford coupe really reminds me of a car you would see in a ZZ Top rock video. All it needed was a hot girl in a bikini lounging next to it to be a complete. This particular car doesn’t see much racing these days, spending its time mostly at car shows and Concours d’Elegance shows. But the owner did track 1/4 mile it with slicks on the back which produced a respectable time of 10.85 seconds at 111.2 mph. He just had to know! So if you are looking for a project this winter and have an inordinate amount of money to throw at it, a car like this is a great project. Happy Hunting!! :-)

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